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Is loneliness the AKP’s or Turkey’s fate? by Dr. Selim Savas Genc (Fatih University), Today’s Zaman

This Article “Is Loneliness the AKP’s Or Turkey’s Fate?” by Dr. Selim Savas Genc (Fatih University), published in Today’s Zaman, February 26, 2015 can be found at the following link:

http://www.todayszaman.com/op-ed_is-loneliness-the-akps-or-turkeys-fate_373693.html

It is a well written article and pretty much sums up the atmosphere in Turkey.

*Due to certain media restrictions and other freedom of expression issues in Turkey I wish to add: the thoughts and opinions expressed in this Article are solely those of the author: Dr. Selim Savas Gench and Today’s Zaman. My re-blogging/sharing of this Article from Today’s Zaman here does not necessarily constitute an endorsement of the views or opinions contained in the Article. You should make up your own mind about the thoughts and opinions expressed in this Article.

**The Article and images are copyright by Today’s Zaman. I do not own the copyright and its sharing/posting here is permissible fair use.

Men support women’s rights in Turkey… by wearing miniskirts

Updated 1507 GMT (2307 HKT) February 23, 2015

This is a very recent article (Feb. 23, 2015) written by Monica Sarkar. The original can be found here: http://edition.cnn.com/2015/02/22/europe/turkey-men-miniskirts/

Turkish men wearing skirts demonstrate in Istanbul to support women's rights in memory of 20-year-old murdered woman Ozgecan Aslan on February 21, 2015.

Orhun Hakan Yalincak

Turkey’s coming police state Turkey’s new security bill curbs freedom of expression and legalises suppression of dissent.

Turkey’s coming police state: Turkey’s new security bill curbs freedom of expression and legalises suppression of dissent.

This is an Article by David Lepeska, a freelance writer based in Istanbul, Turkey and appeared on Aljazeera. The link to the Article can be found here and is worth a read:

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2015/02/turkey-coming-police-state-150225121446232.html

*Thoughts and opinions expressed are solely those of the author (David Lepeska). I do not own the copyright. The original can be accessed at the link above.

**My re-blogging/sharing of this Article does not necessarily constitute an endorsement of the views or opinions of Mr. Lepeska or Aljazeera.

Concerns Over the Arrest, Detention and Trials Against Lawyers in Turkey

Original By European Lawyers Promoting Law & Justice (Les Avocats Europeens Pour Le Droit & La Justice) on behalf of Council of Bars & Law Societies of Europe

Found Here:

http://www.ccbe.eu/fileadmin/user_upload/NTCdocument/HR_Letter_Turkey__Pr1_1423564098.pdf

*Due to certain media restrictions and other freedom of expression issues in Turkey I wish to add: the thoughts and opinions expressed in the letter are solely those of the author (European Lawyers Promoting Law & Justice). My re-blogging/sharing of this Article/Letter does not necessarily constitute an endorsement of the views or opinions contained in the Article/Letter.

The Debate about having a debate about a business and human rights treaty

Castan Centre for Human Rights Law

By Joanna Kyriakakis

The current debate about the desirability of renewing discussions on a UN Business and Human Rights treaty frustrates me a little. There. I said it. I am not referring to conversations about what the substance of any treaty might look like, which will in due course be necessary. Rather, it is opposition to the renewal of treaty efforts at all that I am struggling with. I say this well aware of the political history in this area and, in particular, that the last proposed treaty, the Draft Norms for Transnational Corporations, inspired polarised views.

To provide some background. Following recommendations of the UN Special Representative on Business and Human Rights (SRSG), the UN adopted the Protect, Respect and Remedy Framework (2008) and Guiding Principles (2011) to guide international action on business and human rights. According to this approach, states will commit more strongly to remedying the…

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You can judge a society by how well it treats its prisoners

Mephitic's BS Ramblings

“You can judge a society by how well it treats its prisoners”.

Fyodor Dostoevsky

The last executions in the UK took place in 1964, with capital punishment for murder being abolished in 1969 (1973 in NI)  subsequently it was abolished in all circumstances in 1998. Since 2004 the UK has been prohibited from restoring capital punishment as long as it is party to the European Convention on Human Rights. Despite this, recent opinion polls suggest that the majority of the British population remain in favour of capital punishment.

In stark contrast, the death penalty in a majority of US states is flourishing, as of January 1st 2012 there were 3189 people on death row.  Matthew B. Robinson, PhD Professor of Government & Justice Studies of the Appalachian State University offers an explanation as to why:

  • History & Culture: The US has a long history & culture of violence…

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Turkish President Erdogan’s sexist remarks ‘reinforces prejudices against women’

**Due to certain media restrictions and other freedom of expression issues in Turkey I wish to add: the thoughts and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author from CNN. My re-blogging/sharing of this Article does not necessarily constitute an endorsement of the views or opinions contained therein.

Amanpour

By Madalena Araujo, CNN

Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s sexist remarks serve to reinforce discrimination against women, Turkish parliament member Binnaz Toprak told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Tuesday.

Erdogan triggered a storm of criticism on Monday when he said at a summit hosted by a women’s group in Istanbul that women and men are not equal “because their nature is different.”

Toprak, a member of parliament from Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party, started by saying that “I think … what he means by this, that men and women are not equal, is physical equality.”

But the Turkish MP went on to explain that when one says “gender equality, the principle has to do with legal equality and equal opportunities and legal rights.”

“So I think even if he [President Erdogan] says that it has to do with legality, I think the very statement that men and women are not…

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